pensieri.
"Sing we for love and idleness,
Naught else is worth the having."
-E. Pound
pensieri.
+
"Other people are not medicine."
It took me 9 years to figure that out  (via l-eer)
+
what i write about
+
"Hang yourself, poet, in your own words.
Otherwise, you are dead."
Langston Hughes (via raisethecurve)
+
untimely meetings
+
"You don’t know how deeply you are intertwined with someone until you try to walk away from them."
m.l. - splitterherzen (via perfect)
+
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
lalalagirlwashere:

Looool

OMGGGGG
+
"It’s easy to love someone when they’re happy. What’s hard is loving someone when they’re crying on the bathroom floor at 2am because everything came crashing down at once."

Midnight thoughts (sometimes I’m a mess)

I gotta tell you though, when it comes to the people I have really loved, I have never loved them more than when they’re crying on the bathroom floor at 2 AM.

(via the-cinnamon-peelers-wife)

Ditto. The moment I was most proud of my ability to love came from one of those breakdowns.

(via aromaticthunder)

ABOUT THE BODY BY AMBER TAMBLYN
+
"'The truth sometimes reminds me of a city buried in sand,' Aka said. 'As time passes, the sand piles up even thicker, and occasionally it's blown away and what's below is revealed.'"

Haruki Murakami, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

Wall of text on this novel:

Murakami’s best work lies in his more complex and challenging novels, but this effort puts his other, more human traits front and centre. This is a compassionate novel about nostalgia, loneliness, and memory, about how imagined realities move from the mind to the world. How can human beings achieve peace within themselves and between each other when the space between people is so fraught and unstable? Murakami’s Tsukuru Tazaki, like Toru before him in the excellent Norwegian Wood, embraces solitude but finds himself grasping for human connection, that essential need to which Murakami repeatedly returns. This novel is comforting in ways that it needs to be, and a reader’s enjoyment will probably depend on how much they connect with Tsukuru Tazaki — his life, his trauma, and his inner struggle to find meaning. 

(via willreadbooksformoney)

+
Q: I need an opinion from someone as wise as you: Does love know no bounds? If it does, what are those bounds? Is love worth any pain it can cause whatsoever? I'm struggling with this and in need of reassurance that loving someone is good. Thank you.
Asked by Anonymous
+
+
mercurial-spirit:

whitegirlsaintshit:

apicturesqueplace:

wtf-sabrinaa:

She gets it.



!!!!

damn.
mercurial-spirit:

whitegirlsaintshit:

apicturesqueplace:

wtf-sabrinaa:

She gets it.



!!!!

damn.